C19 UPDATE: Keeping Ourselves and Our Elderly Loved Ones Safer

We have all been warned that our elderly loved ones are at heightened risk during the coronavirus pandemic. Not only are they weaker, but they may live in concentrated senior communities and have underlying health concerns. If you are a caregiver for someone in this high-risk population, here are some tips from Dr. Alicia Arbaje, who specializes in internal medicine and geriatrics at Johns Hopkins.

  1. Keep Yourself Well
    Be sure to follow all the guidelines and precautions about social distancing, hand washing, and cleaning to keep yourself well.
  2. Limit In-Person Visits
    It may be emotionally challenging but keeping in-person visits to a minimum is the best way to reduce the risk of infection. When you can’t be there in-person, use technology to stay in touch. Teach your older loved ones how to use video chat applications. Remember to add captions to your videos if they are hearing-impaired. Also, encourage others to telephone or send cards or notes as well.
  3. Be Creative About Home-Based Projects
    Now may be a great time to encourage your loved ones to record their personal stories, organize family photos or reconnect with old friends online.
  4. Decide on a Plan
    Discuss now your emergency response plan. Who will be the emergency contact? Do you know where the estate planning documents are and can you quickly access them, especially health care directives?

If you or your loved one do not have an updated will or trust and health care documents, please reach out to our office. We can help get planning in place quickly and easily and are even offering virtual meetings now to keep everyone safe.

What if your elder loved one starts to develop symptoms?

If you or your loved one learn that you might have been exposed to someone diagnosed with COVID-19 or if anyone in your household develops symptoms such as cough, fever or shortness of breath, call your family doctor, nurse helpline or urgent care facility. For a medical emergency such as severe shortness of breath or high fever, call 911.

Resource: Johns Hopkins Medicine, Coronavirus and COVID-19: Caregiving for the Elderly, https://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/health/conditions-and-diseases/coronavirus/coronavirus-caregiving-for-the-elderly

Charles Nance Richmond Virginia Attorney

C19 UPDATE: The CARES Act Essentials for Individual Taxpayers and Small Business Owners

The recently enacted CARES Act is designed to provide emergency relief to Americans experiencing economic hardships resulting from the COVID-19 Virus.

For Individuals

  • One-time direct deposits of up to $1,200 for individual taxpayers with incomes up to $75,000 and $2,400 for joint filers with incomes up to $150,000. An additional $500 for each eligible child can also
  • Extended unemployment insurance for the self-employed, independent contractors, and gig economy workers–such as Uber drivers.
  • Rules and penalties for some retirement fund distributions and loans have been adjusted or delayed.

For Small Businesses

  • Employers can defer the payment of their portion of 2020 payroll taxes until 2021 and 2022.
  • $350 billion is dedicated to small business relief to prevent layoffs and business closures and includes:
  • Paycheck protection program for up to 8 weeks of payroll coverage.
  • Economic Injury Disaster Loans and Loan Advance federal disaster loans for businesses, private non-profits, homeowners.
  • The 80% rule from the the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA) net operating loss is lifted, and losses can now be carried back five years.
  • The excess loss limitation (ELL) rules for pass-through entities are suspended.
  • The limitation on the deduction for business interest expense increased from 30% to 50% for tax years 2019 and 2020.
  • $150 billion is dedicated to state and local governments that are beginning to introduce their own business grant and loan programs in states like Florida, Michigan, and New York. Find specific provisions for your state through your governor’s website; see a full list on the National Governors Association site.

Read more about disaster relief efforts under way on our website.

Resources: Read the full text of the CARES Act: https://assets.documentcloud.org/documents/20059055/final-final-cares-act.pdf

Reference for summary of highlights: https://www.forbes.com/sites/leonlabrecque/2020/03/29/the-cares-act-has-passed-here-are-the-highlights/#257f7e6a68cd

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What Is So Important About Powers Of Attorney? (Especially Now?)

Powers of attorney can provide significant authority to another person, if you are unable to do so. These powers can include the right to access your bank accounts and to make decisions for you. Having the right power of attorney, right now, is more important than ever.

AARP’s article from last October entitled, “Powers of Attorney: Crucial Documents for Caregiving,” describes the different types of powers of attorney.

Just like it sounds, a specific power of attorney restricts your agent to taking care of only certain tasks, such as paying bills or selling a house. This power is typically only on a temporary basis.

A general power of attorney provides your agent with sweeping authority. The agent has the authority to step into your shoes and handle all of your legal and financial affairs.

The authority of these powers of attorney can stop at the time you become incapacitated. Durable powers of attorney may be specific or general. However, the “durable” part means your agent retains the authority, even if you become physically or mentally incapacitated. In effect, your family probably won’t need to petition a court to intervene, if you have a medical crisis or have severe cognitive decline like late stage dementia.

In some instances, medical decision-making is part of a durable power of attorney for health care. This can also be addressed in a separate document that is just for health care, like a health care surrogate designation.

Virginia is among the states that recognize “springing” durable powers of attorney. With these, the agent can begin using her authority, only after you become incapacitated. Other states don’t have these, which means your agent can use the document the day you sign the durable power of attorney.

A well-drafted power of attorney helps your agent help you, because she can keep the details of your life addressed, if you cannot. That can be things like applying for financial assistance or a public benefit, such as Medicaid, or verifying that your utilities stay on and your taxes get paid. Attempting to take care of any of these things without the proper document can be almost impossible.

A poorly drafted power of attorney, or one not tailored to your needs now, could make it difficult or impossible for a loved on to apply for important government health care benefits you could need down the road. (Or sooner!)

In the absence of proper incapacity legal planning, your loved ones will need to initiate a court procedure known as a guardianship or conservatorship. However, these hearings can be expensive, time-consuming and contested by family members who don’t agree with moving forward.

Don’t wait to do this. Every person who’s at least age 18 should have a power of attorney in place. If you do have a power of attorney, be sure that it’s up to date. Ask an experienced elder law or estate planning attorney to help you create these documents. And we have no-contact consultations available right now via phone or Zoom Meeting.  Call us now.

Reference: AARP (October 31, 2019) “Powers of Attorney: Crucial Documents for Caregiving”

C19 UPDATE: Bookmark this Page from the IRS for Ongoing Coronavirus Updates

The IRS has established a special section focused on steps to help taxpayers, businesses and others affected by the coronavirus. This page will be updated as new information is available. https://www.irs.gov/coronavirus

For health information about the COVID-19 virus, visit the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) https://www.coronavirus.gov

Other information about actions being taken by the U.S. government visit https://www.usa.gov/coronavirus and in Spanish at https://gobierno.usa.gov/coronavirus.

The Department of Treasury also has information available at Coronavirus: Resources, Updates, and What You Should Know https://home.treasury.gov/coronavirus

C19 UPDATE: Emergency Estate Planning Decisions to Make Right Now

Though it is hard not to panic when our grocery store shelves are empty, the number of confirmed cases of COVID-19 keeps rising — a friend of mine just posted his positive diagnosis yesterday — and we see sobering statistics here and across the globe It is clear we will not overcome this challenge with a panicked response. Or by failing to act.

Clearly, there are things we all need to be doing right now – and Virginia public health officials are the best resource on how to stay personally safe and help prevent the virus from spreading.

When it comes to the seriousness of this outbreak, however, there also are some critical estate planning decisions you should make – or review – right now.  You nay be sitting at home mire this week.  It is a good time to ask yourself these questions:

  1. Who will make medical decisions for me should I become severely ill and unable to make these decisions myself?
  2. Who will make my financial decisions in that same situation — for example, who will be authorized to sign my income tax return, write checks or pay my bills online?
  3. Who is authorized to take care of my minor children in the event of my severe illness? What decisions are they authorized to make? How will they absorb the financial burden?
  4. If the unthinkable happens – what arrangements have I made for the care of my minor children, any family members with special needs, my pets or other vulnerable loved ones?
  5. How will my business continue if I were to become seriously ill and unable to work, even remotely … or in the event of my death?

These are the most personal decisions to make right now to protect yourself and your loved ones during this emergency. Now is also a good time to ask yourself if you have plans in place for the smooth transfer of your assets and preservation of your legacy.

We are ready to help walk you through these decisions, understand the ramifications of your choices, and memorialize your plans in binding legal documents. The Nance Law Firm is currently offering no-contact initial conferences remotely, including consultations via Zoom Meetings. In other words, you may be able to use some of your down time to take care of decisions you may have put off.  Book a call now and let us help you make the right choices for yourself and your loved ones.

Charles Nance Richmond Virginia Attorney

C19 UPDATE: Employers Now May Help Employees with Tax-Free Direct Disaster Relief Assistance

As the coronavirus pandemic emergency unfolds, it’s clear that increasing numbers of employees will likely suffer financial impacts … from quarantines, illnesses, workplace closings, etc. President Trump’s declaration of a national emergency on March 13 now allows employers to make direct disaster-relief payments to assist employees affected by the virus.

These types of payments are not treated as income/wages to the employees and are deductible to the employer as ordinary and necessary business expenses. There is no specific cap on the amount of assistance that may be provided to an employee other than it must be “reasonable and necessary” and must not be for an expense reimbursable by the employee’s insurance.

Section 139 of the Internal Revenue Code, allows that a “qualified disaster relief payment” of any amount may be paid to reimburse or pay reasonable and necessary personal, family, living or funeral expenses (not otherwise compensated for by insurance) incurred because of a “qualified disaster.” The term “qualified disaster” includes a federally declared disaster or emergency under the Stafford Act. Accordingly, due to the Declaration, Coronavirus is now a “qualified disaster” for Section 139 purposes, so disaster relief may be provided to employees on a tax-free basis (assuming all the requirements of Section 139 are satisfied).

Now. If only our small business clients had more income to share!

As always check with your CPA or tax attorney before implementing any tax planning strategy for your business.

Read more at The National Review, Coronavirus National Emergency Declaration Permits Employers to Offer Tax-Favored Financial Assistance to Employees, March 14, 2020

 

An Estate Plan Is Necessary for the Unthinkable

As an estate planning attorney, I was gratified to see “Debbie Downer” return to SNL last week. She reminds us. Bad stuff happens. As if the spreading Coronavirus wasn’t reminder enough. And we have to be ready. Someone sent me a recent article from California’s The Press Enterprise titled Yes, you must go there: Think about the unthinkable, plan for the worst” which explains the steps.

Put an appointment in your schedule. Make an appointment with a qualified estate planning attorney. If you make the call and have an actual appointment, you have a deadline and that’s a start. The attorney may have a planning worksheet or organizer that he or she can send to you to guide you.

Start getting organized. If this seems overwhelming, break it out into separate parts. Begin with the easy part: a list of names, addresses, phone numbers, and email addresses for family members. Include any other people who you intend to include in your estate plan.

Next, list your assets and an estimated value of each. It doesn’t have to be to the penny. Include the account numbers, name of the institution, phone number and, if you have a personal contact, a name. Include bank accounts, real estate holdings, timeshares, stocks, bonds, personal property, vehicles, RVs, any collectibles of value (attach appraisals if you have them), life insurance and retirement accounts. Don’t just list what you own, but how you own it: joint, separate, payable on death, etc.  See What Should I Know about Beneficiary Designations?

List the professionals who you rely on—your estate planning lawyer, CPA, financial advisor, etc.

If you own a firearm, include your license and make sure that both your spouse and your estate planning attorney are aware of the information. Speak with your estate planning attorney about the law in your state and how to prepare for a situation if the firearm needs to be safely and properly dealt with. And your trustee or executor could get in serious trouble for transferring a firearm to a prohibited person upon your death.

Name an executor or personal representative. Estate planning is not just for death. It is also for incapacity. Who will act on your behalf, if you are not able to do so? Many people name their spouse, a long-time trusted friend or a family member. Be certain that person will be willing to act on your behalf and carry out your instructions. Have a second person also named, in case something occurs, and your first choice cannot serve.

If you have minor children, your estate plan will include a guardian, who will be responsible for raising them. Talk about that with your spouse and that person to make sure they are willing to serve. You can also name a second person to be in charge of finances for the children. Your estate planning lawyer will talk with you about the role of trusts to provide for the children.

Think about your overall goals. How do you see your legacy? Do you want to leave some funds for a charity that has meaning to you and your family? Do you want your children to receive equal shares of your entire estate? Does one child require special needs planning, or are you concerned that one of your children may not be able to manage an inheritance? These are all topics to discuss with your estate planning attorney. Their experience will help clarify your goals and create a plan.

Reference: The Press Enterprise (Feb. 2, 2020) Yes, you must go there: Think about the unthinkable, plan for the worst

Our Response to COVID-19: “No Time to Go Dark!”

Greetings from the Nance Law Firm!

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Many of our clients are considered “at risk” for the Coronavirus or secondary reactions to it. If they are not knowingly at risk, they often care for those who are. They depend on us, and this is no time for our firm to go dark. And we are going to be here for them at all times.

For clients and friends who’ve asked or wondered, the Nance Law Firm continues to be open during regular hours: Monday – Friday, 8:30am to 5pm. (As usual we see clients by appointment only.) Cleaning and sanitizing measures — always good — have been heightened to include additional hand sanitizer available for guest use, and sanitizing each conference room between in-person meetings. Our building’s frequent bathroom cleanings continue apace. The safety of guests and staff is our primary concern, and we encourage you to follow the recommended CDC guidelines.

Additionally, our updated website now has a unique feature to allow you to schedule a telephone conference at your convenience online. You can use that feature 24/7 wherever you live. Here’s how to book a call now. https://www.nancelawfirm.net/book-a-call/

Finally, as things get worse — and they will — we will offer appointments and family meetings, both in office and remotely, via Zoom meetings. (Sounds hard but it is not. If you’re reading this, you have a computer or iPhone, and you can meet us remotely!). You can join Zoom here now for free. https://zoom.us

Updates to come – follow along on our social channels for the latest information. We hope to “see” you soon!

Whitney Hendrix

Director of Client Services

How Can Long-Distance Caregivers Help Loved Ones?

Managing for an aging family member is never easy, and possible travel restrictions or hazards related to the Coronavirus make it even tougher, and more important. A recent article noted that long-distance caregivers have the same concerns and pressures as local caregivers, perhaps even more. They spend about twice as much on caregiving as people caring for a loved one nearby, because they’re more likely to need to hire help, take uncompensated time off work and pay for travel. A huge challenge for this group is just staying informed and assured that the person needing care is in good hands. As a result, long-distance caregivers must have good communication and a solid team on the ground. That team may include a local elder law attorney.

AARP’s recent article entitled “Long-Distance Caregiving: 5 Key Steps to Providing Care From Afar” provides us with five steps to staying informed and effective as a long-distance caregiver and thoughts for implementing the measures.

  1. Be sure you have access to information. Having a means of receiving good information and possessing legal authority to make financial and health-care decisions is critical for all primary caregivers, but it’s even greater for ones caring from a distance. Arrange as much as you can during an in-person visit. Consider booking a call with an elder law attorney when you are in town (or remotely, if advisable). The right legal documents can be critical. See https://www.nancelawfirm.net/what-estate-planning-documents-do-you-need/
  • Start the discussion on finances and map out with your loved one how to pay for health care and everyday expenses.
  • Ask whether your parent or other senior is able to sign the forms or make the calls necessary to give doctors, hospitals and insurers permission to share information with you or another trusted family member. This should include banks and utilities.
  • Be sure the senior has designated a durable power of attorney for health care and financial decisions.
  • Know what to do in an emergency, as far as access to the home by a neighbor, if needed.
  1. Create your on-the-ground support team. Don’t try to do it all, especially if your loved one has more serious or complicated health issues. In addition to healthcare professionals, ask friends, family and community groups to join a network of caregiving helpmates. Remember to add your loved one as part of the team.
  • Assign roles and tasks, that the members of the team are willing and able to do.
  • Create a list with contact info for everyone and keep it up to date.
  1. Consider hiring a reputable caregiving professional. They’re often called a geriatric care manager, aging life care manager, or eldercare navigator or coordinator. These professionals are frequently licensed nurses or social workers who can also be valuable mediators or sounding boards, when family members disagree on care decisions. Elder law attorneys may have good care managers to recommend.
  • Verify the person’s professional certifications, see how long the person has been in the field and request references.
  • Care managers can charge $50 to $200 an hour. Medicare doesn’t cover this service, nor do most health insurance plans. However, if you can handle it financially, an experienced manager may be able to save your family time, money and stress with even a short call.
  1. Find ways to communicate regularly with your local support group and loved one. You should leverage technology. With permission, place video monitors, wearable activity trackers, remote door locks to prevent wandering (if the care recipient has dementia) and even electronic pill dispensers that can tell you if someone has taken the prescribed medications.
  2. Leverage your visits. Nothing’s better than an in-person visit. When you can manage one, come with a list of things you need to know or discuss.
  • Interview possible home aides or house cleaners or meet with social workers or other professionals involved in your loved one’s care to discuss any concerns.
  • Look for signs of abuse, which means monitoring your senior’s checking account and see if there are any irregularities and look for red flags of physical or emotional mistreatment, like bruises, unexplained injuries, or a sudden change in personality. Note if your family member talks about a person you’ve never met who visits often and has been “very helpful.”

Although you may have several practical tasks to tick off your list, it’s important to spend quality time with your loved one. And seek the advice of a qualified elder law attorney, if you have any questions.

Reference: AARP (Oct. 30, 2019) “Long-Distance Caregiving: 5 Key Steps to Providing Care From Af

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